Consistent evidence suggests that the cerebellum contributes to the processing of emotional facial expressions. However, it is not yet known whether the cerebellum is recruited when emotions are expressed by body postures or movements, or whether it is recruited differently for positive and negative emotions. In this study, we asked healthy participants to discriminate between body postures (with masked face) expressing emotions of opposite valence (happiness vs. anger, Experiment 1), or of the same valence (negative: anger vs. sadness; positive: happiness vs. surprise, Experiment 2). Whilst performing the task, participants received online TMS over a region of the posterior left cerebellum and over two control sites (early visual cortex and vertex). We found that TMS over the cerebellum affected participants' ability to discriminate emotional body postures, but only when one of the emotions was negatively valenced (i.e., anger). These findings suggest that the cerebellar region we stimulated is involved in processing the emotional content conveyed by body postures and gestures. Our findings complement prior evidence on the role of the cerebellum in emotional face processing and have important implications from a clinical perspective, where non-invasive cerebellar stimulation is a promising tool in the treatment of motor, cognitive and affective deficits.

(2022). Cerebellar contribution to emotional body language perception: a TMS study [journal article - articolo]. In SOCIAL COGNITIVE AND AFFECTIVE NEUROSCIENCE. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10446/216192

Cerebellar contribution to emotional body language perception: a TMS study

Cattaneo, Zaira
2022-01-01

Abstract

Consistent evidence suggests that the cerebellum contributes to the processing of emotional facial expressions. However, it is not yet known whether the cerebellum is recruited when emotions are expressed by body postures or movements, or whether it is recruited differently for positive and negative emotions. In this study, we asked healthy participants to discriminate between body postures (with masked face) expressing emotions of opposite valence (happiness vs. anger, Experiment 1), or of the same valence (negative: anger vs. sadness; positive: happiness vs. surprise, Experiment 2). Whilst performing the task, participants received online TMS over a region of the posterior left cerebellum and over two control sites (early visual cortex and vertex). We found that TMS over the cerebellum affected participants' ability to discriminate emotional body postures, but only when one of the emotions was negatively valenced (i.e., anger). These findings suggest that the cerebellar region we stimulated is involved in processing the emotional content conveyed by body postures and gestures. Our findings complement prior evidence on the role of the cerebellum in emotional face processing and have important implications from a clinical perspective, where non-invasive cerebellar stimulation is a promising tool in the treatment of motor, cognitive and affective deficits.
articolo
2022
Ferrari, Chiara; Ciricugno, Andrea; Urgesi, Cosimo; Cattaneo, Zaira
(2022). Cerebellar contribution to emotional body language perception: a TMS study [journal article - articolo]. In SOCIAL COGNITIVE AND AFFECTIVE NEUROSCIENCE. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10446/216192
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