Among the various technology enablers for modern electrical machines, additive manufacturing plays a key role. The advantage of having a precise control of the shape of ferromagnetic structures, whilst achieving good electromagnetic performance, fits well with the design requirements of rotating electrical machines. To a certain extent, some of the physical properties of the material can be 'tuned', allowing for quick trade-off studies (i.e., prototyping), as opposed to conventional manufacturing techniques. Despite being considered an enabling technology, 3D printing of soft magnetic materials for electric motors is still at an embryonic stage. This work, thus, aims in providing an initial proof of concept. For the purpose, a switched reluctance machine is chosen as a case study. Its rotor core is additively manufactured through selective laser melting. Its performances are compared to those of an identical commercial motor featuring a laminated rotor core, via in-depth experimental tests. Initial results show that the 3D printed machine can actually develop the rated power, but with an efficiency reduction.

(2020). 3D printing as a technology enabler for electrical machines: Manufacturing and testing of a salient pole rotor for SRM . Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10446/224350

3D printing as a technology enabler for electrical machines: Manufacturing and testing of a salient pole rotor for SRM

Giangrande, Paolo;
2020

Abstract

Among the various technology enablers for modern electrical machines, additive manufacturing plays a key role. The advantage of having a precise control of the shape of ferromagnetic structures, whilst achieving good electromagnetic performance, fits well with the design requirements of rotating electrical machines. To a certain extent, some of the physical properties of the material can be 'tuned', allowing for quick trade-off studies (i.e., prototyping), as opposed to conventional manufacturing techniques. Despite being considered an enabling technology, 3D printing of soft magnetic materials for electric motors is still at an embryonic stage. This work, thus, aims in providing an initial proof of concept. For the purpose, a switched reluctance machine is chosen as a case study. Its rotor core is additively manufactured through selective laser melting. Its performances are compared to those of an identical commercial motor featuring a laminated rotor core, via in-depth experimental tests. Initial results show that the 3D printed machine can actually develop the rated power, but with an efficiency reduction.
Gargalis, Leonidas; Madonna, Vincenzo; Giangrande, Paolo; Hardy, Mark; Ashcroft, Ian; Galea, Michael; Hague, Richard
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10446/224350
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