Testing is widely seen as one core element of a successful strategy to curtail the COVID-19 pandemic and many countries have increased their effort s to provide testing at large scale. As most democratic governments refrain from enacting mandatory testing, a key emerging challenge is to increase voluntary participation. Using behavioural economics insights complemented with data from a novel survey in the US and a survey experiment in Luxembourg, we examine behavioural factors associated with the individual willingness to get tested (WTT). In our analysis, individual characteristics that correlate positively with WTT include age, altruism, conformism, the tendency to abide by government-imposed rules, concern about contracting COVID-19, and patience. Risk aversion, unemployment, and conservative political orientation correlate negatively with WTT. Building on and expanding these insights may prove fruitful for policy to effectively raise people's propensity to get tested. (c) 2021 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ )

(2021). How to make universal, voluntary testing for COVID-19 work? A behavioural economics perspective [journal article - articolo]. In HEALTH POLICY. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10446/228054

How to make universal, voluntary testing for COVID-19 work? A behavioural economics perspective

Fallucchi, Francesco;
2021-01-01

Abstract

Testing is widely seen as one core element of a successful strategy to curtail the COVID-19 pandemic and many countries have increased their effort s to provide testing at large scale. As most democratic governments refrain from enacting mandatory testing, a key emerging challenge is to increase voluntary participation. Using behavioural economics insights complemented with data from a novel survey in the US and a survey experiment in Luxembourg, we examine behavioural factors associated with the individual willingness to get tested (WTT). In our analysis, individual characteristics that correlate positively with WTT include age, altruism, conformism, the tendency to abide by government-imposed rules, concern about contracting COVID-19, and patience. Risk aversion, unemployment, and conservative political orientation correlate negatively with WTT. Building on and expanding these insights may prove fruitful for policy to effectively raise people's propensity to get tested. (c) 2021 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ )
articolo
Fallucchi, Francesco; Görges, Luise; Machado, Joël; Pieters, Arne; Suhrcke, Marc
(2021). How to make universal, voluntary testing for COVID-19 work? A behavioural economics perspective [journal article - articolo]. In HEALTH POLICY. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10446/228054
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