Psychological variables may be crucial in favoring or discouraging health-related behaviors, including vaccine acceptance. This study aimed to extend the previous literature by outlining the psychological profile associated with COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in a sample of Italian citizens. Between April and May 2021, 1122 Italian volunteers completed a web survey on COVID-19 vaccine acceptance, also including several self-reported psychological measures. A multiple hierarchical logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the psychological variables associated with vaccine hesitancy. Low confidence in COVID-19 vaccine efficacy and safety, low collective responsibility, high complacency, and high calculation (i.e., extensive information searching, and costs–benefit estimates) predicted higher hesitancy. Our results suggest that to be effective, vaccine-related communications should be as clear, understandable, and sound as possible, preventing the spreading of misunderstandings, or even fake information, that may foster people’s insecurities and distrust. Furthermore, the advantages and necessity of vaccination, both at the individual and community-level, should be clearly emphasized. Efficacious vaccine-related communications may be crucial, not only to maintain an adequate immunity rate for COVID-19, but also to inform policymakers and public authorities in the case of possible future infectious outbreaks.

(2022). Behind the Scenes of COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy: Psychological Predictors in an Italian Community Sample [journal article - articolo]. In VACCINES. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10446/229436

Behind the Scenes of COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy: Psychological Predictors in an Italian Community Sample

Brugnera, A.;Compare, A.;
2022

Abstract

Psychological variables may be crucial in favoring or discouraging health-related behaviors, including vaccine acceptance. This study aimed to extend the previous literature by outlining the psychological profile associated with COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in a sample of Italian citizens. Between April and May 2021, 1122 Italian volunteers completed a web survey on COVID-19 vaccine acceptance, also including several self-reported psychological measures. A multiple hierarchical logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the psychological variables associated with vaccine hesitancy. Low confidence in COVID-19 vaccine efficacy and safety, low collective responsibility, high complacency, and high calculation (i.e., extensive information searching, and costs–benefit estimates) predicted higher hesitancy. Our results suggest that to be effective, vaccine-related communications should be as clear, understandable, and sound as possible, preventing the spreading of misunderstandings, or even fake information, that may foster people’s insecurities and distrust. Furthermore, the advantages and necessity of vaccination, both at the individual and community-level, should be clearly emphasized. Efficacious vaccine-related communications may be crucial, not only to maintain an adequate immunity rate for COVID-19, but also to inform policymakers and public authorities in the case of possible future infectious outbreaks.
articolo
Tagini, S.; Brugnera, A.; Ferrucci, R.; Priori, A.; Compare, A.; Parolin, L.; Pravettoni, G.; Silani, V.; Poletti, B.
(2022). Behind the Scenes of COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy: Psychological Predictors in an Italian Community Sample [journal article - articolo]. In VACCINES. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10446/229436
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10446/229436
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