Are democracy and constitutions capable of building peace or can they only regulate war? The answer requires rethinking the entire set of constitutional provisions (art. 11, 52, 78 and 87) that assume legal pacifism (the building of “peace through law”) as a meaningful horizon to be dutifully pursued. Starting from art. 11, that envisions disarmed sovereignty as the alternative to the war definitely repudiated by the Constitution, by the means of a conditional internationalism, committed to creating peace and justice among the Nations and building an international order of disarmed sovereignty. The Constitution assigns the power and the responsibility to decide the war to the Parliament, due to the need of legitimation and because of the method and the transparency of parliamentary decision-making. Consequently, according to art. 78, the granting of "necessary" powers to the Government by the Parliament does not only concern the extent of domestic powers in case of war ("necessary powers" versus “full power”). Rather, reading art. 78 in the light of art. 11, it means that only Parliament can extraordinarily confer to the Government war powers which it cannot normally dispose of, because they do not belong to the constitutionally legitimate toolbox of the ordinary international policy-making.

(2022). Per un ordine della sovranità disarmata [journal article - articolo]. In OSSERVATORIO COSTITUZIONALE. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10446/229670

Per un ordine della sovranità disarmata

Pezzini, Barbara
2022

Abstract

Are democracy and constitutions capable of building peace or can they only regulate war? The answer requires rethinking the entire set of constitutional provisions (art. 11, 52, 78 and 87) that assume legal pacifism (the building of “peace through law”) as a meaningful horizon to be dutifully pursued. Starting from art. 11, that envisions disarmed sovereignty as the alternative to the war definitely repudiated by the Constitution, by the means of a conditional internationalism, committed to creating peace and justice among the Nations and building an international order of disarmed sovereignty. The Constitution assigns the power and the responsibility to decide the war to the Parliament, due to the need of legitimation and because of the method and the transparency of parliamentary decision-making. Consequently, according to art. 78, the granting of "necessary" powers to the Government by the Parliament does not only concern the extent of domestic powers in case of war ("necessary powers" versus “full power”). Rather, reading art. 78 in the light of art. 11, it means that only Parliament can extraordinarily confer to the Government war powers which it cannot normally dispose of, because they do not belong to the constitutionally legitimate toolbox of the ordinary international policy-making.
articolo
Pezzini, Barbara
(2022). Per un ordine della sovranità disarmata [journal article - articolo]. In OSSERVATORIO COSTITUZIONALE. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10446/229670
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