Introduction: This study examined changes in the clinical interaction in a single clinical dyad between sessions conducted in person and sessions conducted remotely, applying linguistic indicators based on multiple code and referential process theory. Methods: Sessions from an ongoing psychotherapy of a male patient in his late 30s were audio-recorded and transcribed. Linguistic indicators, including the Weighted Referential Activity Dictionary (WRAD), were scored, and graphed using the Discourse Attributes Analysis Program (DAAP). The sessions included 8 sessions immediately before online work, 10 sessions immediately following the implementation of online work, and 12 sessions collected several months after the clinical dyad had been working remotely. Results: A comparison of in-person sessions to telehealth sessions shows that the patient spoke more in post-telehealth sessions but with decreased emotional engagement, as evidenced by a decrease in WRAD. The therapist appeared to be working harder to communicate that he was listening as evidenced by an increase in the measure of non-turn vocalizations (interjections such as hmm). Discussion: It appears that both patient and therapist were working harder to remain connected and communicate that they were present but with limited emotional engagement. This pattern remained unaltered at a 2-month followup. The findings address empirically the subjective experience of many clinicians who have switched to remote treatment. Implications for the future of remote therapy are discussed.

(2022). Changes in Clinical Process as a Result of Online Therapy: Findings from a Single Case Study [journal article - articolo]. In PSYCHODYNAMIC PSYCHIATRY. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10446/233561

Changes in Clinical Process as a Result of Online Therapy: Findings from a Single Case Study

Negri, Attà;
2022-01-01

Abstract

Introduction: This study examined changes in the clinical interaction in a single clinical dyad between sessions conducted in person and sessions conducted remotely, applying linguistic indicators based on multiple code and referential process theory. Methods: Sessions from an ongoing psychotherapy of a male patient in his late 30s were audio-recorded and transcribed. Linguistic indicators, including the Weighted Referential Activity Dictionary (WRAD), were scored, and graphed using the Discourse Attributes Analysis Program (DAAP). The sessions included 8 sessions immediately before online work, 10 sessions immediately following the implementation of online work, and 12 sessions collected several months after the clinical dyad had been working remotely. Results: A comparison of in-person sessions to telehealth sessions shows that the patient spoke more in post-telehealth sessions but with decreased emotional engagement, as evidenced by a decrease in WRAD. The therapist appeared to be working harder to communicate that he was listening as evidenced by an increase in the measure of non-turn vocalizations (interjections such as hmm). Discussion: It appears that both patient and therapist were working harder to remain connected and communicate that they were present but with limited emotional engagement. This pattern remained unaltered at a 2-month followup. The findings address empirically the subjective experience of many clinicians who have switched to remote treatment. Implications for the future of remote therapy are discussed.
articolo
Negri, Atta' Ambrogio Maria; Christian, Christopher
(2022). Changes in Clinical Process as a Result of Online Therapy: Findings from a Single Case Study [journal article - articolo]. In PSYCHODYNAMIC PSYCHIATRY. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10446/233561
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10446/233561
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