The global spread of COVID-19 and the declaration of the pandemic status made by the World Health Organization (WHO) led to the establishment of mass vaccination campaigns. The challenges posed by the request to immunise the entire population necessitated the set-up of new vaccination sites, named Mass Vaccination Centres (MVCs), capable of handling large numbers of patients rapidly and safely. The present study focused on the evolution of MVC performances, in terms of the maximum number of vaccinated patients and primary resource utilisation ratio, while involving statistics belonging to the patient dimension. The research involved the creation of a digital model of the MVC, using the Discrete-Event Simulation (DES) software (FlexSim Healthcare), and consequent what-if analyses. The results were derived from the study of an existing facility, located within a sports centre in the province of Bergamo (Italy) and operating with an advanced MVC organisational model, in compliance with the national anti-SARS-CoV-2 legislation. The research provided additional evidence on innovative MVC organisational models, identifying an optimal MVC configuration. Besides, the obtained results remain relevant for countries where a significant portion of the population has not yet addressed the emergency, either for upcoming vaccination treatments. Furthermore, the methodology adopted in the present article proved to be a valuable resource in the analysis of the healthcare processes.

(2023). Discrete-event simulation study of a COVID-19 mass vaccination centre [journal article - articolo]. In INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MEDICAL INFORMATICS. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10446/238489

Discrete-event simulation study of a COVID-19 mass vaccination centre

Sala, Francesca;D'Urso, Gianluca;Giardini, Claudio
2023-01-01

Abstract

The global spread of COVID-19 and the declaration of the pandemic status made by the World Health Organization (WHO) led to the establishment of mass vaccination campaigns. The challenges posed by the request to immunise the entire population necessitated the set-up of new vaccination sites, named Mass Vaccination Centres (MVCs), capable of handling large numbers of patients rapidly and safely. The present study focused on the evolution of MVC performances, in terms of the maximum number of vaccinated patients and primary resource utilisation ratio, while involving statistics belonging to the patient dimension. The research involved the creation of a digital model of the MVC, using the Discrete-Event Simulation (DES) software (FlexSim Healthcare), and consequent what-if analyses. The results were derived from the study of an existing facility, located within a sports centre in the province of Bergamo (Italy) and operating with an advanced MVC organisational model, in compliance with the national anti-SARS-CoV-2 legislation. The research provided additional evidence on innovative MVC organisational models, identifying an optimal MVC configuration. Besides, the obtained results remain relevant for countries where a significant portion of the population has not yet addressed the emergency, either for upcoming vaccination treatments. Furthermore, the methodology adopted in the present article proved to be a valuable resource in the analysis of the healthcare processes.
articolo
2023
Sala, Francesca; D'Urso, Gianluca Danilo; Giardini, Claudio
(2023). Discrete-event simulation study of a COVID-19 mass vaccination centre [journal article - articolo]. In INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MEDICAL INFORMATICS. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10446/238489
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10446/238489
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