Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) predisposes to aortic aneurysms with a high prevalence. A first hypothesis for this phenomenon is related to fibrillin deficiency (genetic hypothesis). The present article focused on a complementary, hemodynamic hypothesis stating that it is the peculiar fluid dynamics of blood in the ascending aorta of patients with BAV configurations that leads to aneurysm formation. To corroborate this hypothesis, a parametric study was performed based on numerical simulations of ascending aorta hemodynamics with different configurations of orifice area and valve orientation. The resulting wall shear stress (WSS) distributions and degree of asymmetry of the blood jet were investigated, and surrogate indices introduced. The results showed that WSS was more pronounced in subjects with BAV morphologies, also in the nonstenotic case. In particular, a maximum WSS of 3 Pa was found (vs. 1.5 Pa in subjects with a tricuspid configuration). It is localized at the mid-ascending aorta, the segment more prone to dilate as shown by the index related to maximum WSS (0.869 in BAV vs. 0.322 in tricuspid). Moreover, the asymmetry of the blood flow was found larger for decreasing valve area, the related index at mid-ascending aorta being more than three times higher than that found for tricuspid configuration (0.70 vs. 0.20). Further, WSS and flow asymmetry were higher also at the sinus of Valsalva and sinotubolar junction for a latero-lateral (LL) BAV configuration in keeping with the clinical observation on association between BAV configurations and different aortic aneurysm morphology. These findings may help explain the higher risk of aneurysm formation in BAV patients. The proposed indices will require validation prior to application in clinical settings.

Influence of bicuspid valve geometry on ascending aortic fluid-dynamics: a parametric study

VERGARA, Christian;
2012-01-01

Abstract

Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) predisposes to aortic aneurysms with a high prevalence. A first hypothesis for this phenomenon is related to fibrillin deficiency (genetic hypothesis). The present article focused on a complementary, hemodynamic hypothesis stating that it is the peculiar fluid dynamics of blood in the ascending aorta of patients with BAV configurations that leads to aneurysm formation. To corroborate this hypothesis, a parametric study was performed based on numerical simulations of ascending aorta hemodynamics with different configurations of orifice area and valve orientation. The resulting wall shear stress (WSS) distributions and degree of asymmetry of the blood jet were investigated, and surrogate indices introduced. The results showed that WSS was more pronounced in subjects with BAV morphologies, also in the nonstenotic case. In particular, a maximum WSS of 3 Pa was found (vs. 1.5 Pa in subjects with a tricuspid configuration). It is localized at the mid-ascending aorta, the segment more prone to dilate as shown by the index related to maximum WSS (0.869 in BAV vs. 0.322 in tricuspid). Moreover, the asymmetry of the blood flow was found larger for decreasing valve area, the related index at mid-ascending aorta being more than three times higher than that found for tricuspid configuration (0.70 vs. 0.20). Further, WSS and flow asymmetry were higher also at the sinus of Valsalva and sinotubolar junction for a latero-lateral (LL) BAV configuration in keeping with the clinical observation on association between BAV configurations and different aortic aneurysm morphology. These findings may help explain the higher risk of aneurysm formation in BAV patients. The proposed indices will require validation prior to application in clinical settings.
journal article - articolo
2012
Vergara, Christian; Viscardi, Francesca; Antiga, Luca; Luciani, GIOVANNI BATTISTA
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10446/26284
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