Previous research has highlighted the positive impact of greater health-related quality of life (Hr-QoL) and subjective well-being (SWB) on chronic diseases’ severity and progression. There is a paucity of studies investigating the long-term trajectories of these variables among hypertensive patients. The present study aims to investigate the relationships between psychological variables (Type A and D personality, locus of control—LoC, self-esteem, and trait anxiety) with SWB and Hr-QoL in patients with hypertension and comorbid metabolic syndrome. A total of 185 volunteer patients (130 males, 70.3%; mean age 54 ± 10.93) were enrolled. Patients filled out measures of Hr-QoL and SWB, LoC, and self-esteem at three time points—Type A and D behaviors and anxiety measures only at baseline. Analyses were run through two-level hierarchical mixed models with repeated measures (Level 1) nested within participants (Level 2), controlling for sociodemographic and clinical confounders. Neither Hr-QoL nor SWB changed over time. Patients with greater self-esteem and internal LoC (and lower external LoC) increased their SWB and Hr-QoL up to 1-year follow-up. A greater Type A behavior and trait anxiety at baseline predicted a longitudinal increase in most of the dependent variables. Results suggest that it could be useful to tailor interventions targeting specific variables to increase Hr-QoL and SWB among hypertensive patients.

(2024). Predictors of Psychological Well-Being and Quality of Life in Patients with Hypertension: A Longitudinal Study. [journal article - articolo]. In HEALTHCARE. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10446/266170

Predictors of Psychological Well-Being and Quality of Life in Patients with Hypertension: A Longitudinal Study.

Crepaldi, M.;Giannì, J.;Brugnera, A.;Greco, A.;Compare, A.;Rusconi, M. L.;
2024-01-01

Abstract

Previous research has highlighted the positive impact of greater health-related quality of life (Hr-QoL) and subjective well-being (SWB) on chronic diseases’ severity and progression. There is a paucity of studies investigating the long-term trajectories of these variables among hypertensive patients. The present study aims to investigate the relationships between psychological variables (Type A and D personality, locus of control—LoC, self-esteem, and trait anxiety) with SWB and Hr-QoL in patients with hypertension and comorbid metabolic syndrome. A total of 185 volunteer patients (130 males, 70.3%; mean age 54 ± 10.93) were enrolled. Patients filled out measures of Hr-QoL and SWB, LoC, and self-esteem at three time points—Type A and D behaviors and anxiety measures only at baseline. Analyses were run through two-level hierarchical mixed models with repeated measures (Level 1) nested within participants (Level 2), controlling for sociodemographic and clinical confounders. Neither Hr-QoL nor SWB changed over time. Patients with greater self-esteem and internal LoC (and lower external LoC) increased their SWB and Hr-QoL up to 1-year follow-up. A greater Type A behavior and trait anxiety at baseline predicted a longitudinal increase in most of the dependent variables. Results suggest that it could be useful to tailor interventions targeting specific variables to increase Hr-QoL and SWB among hypertensive patients.
articolo
2024
Crepaldi, Maura; Gianni', Jessica; Brugnera, Agostino; Greco, Andrea; Compare, Angelo; Rusconi, Maria Luisa; Poletti, B.; Omboni, S.; Tasca, G. A.; Parati, G.
(2024). Predictors of Psychological Well-Being and Quality of Life in Patients with Hypertension: A Longitudinal Study. [journal article - articolo]. In HEALTHCARE. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10446/266170
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10446/266170
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