The cerebellum causally supports social processing by generating internal models of social events based on statistical learning of behavioral regularities. However, whether the cerebellum is only involved in forming or also in using internal models for the prediction of forthcoming actions is still unclear. We used cerebellar transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (ctDCS) to modulate the performance of healthy adults in using previously learned expectations in an action prediction task. In a first learning phase of this task, participants were exposed to different levels of associations between specific actions and contextual elements, to induce the formation of either strongly or moderately informative expectations. In a following testing phase, which assessed the use of these expectations for predicting ambiguous (i.e. temporally occluded) actions, we delivered ctDCS. Results showed that anodic, compared to sham, ctDCS boosted the prediction of actions embedded in moderately, but not strongly, informative contexts. Since ctDCS was delivered during the testing phase, that is after expectations were established, our findings suggest that the cerebellum is causally involved in using internal models (and not just in generating them). This encourages the exploration of the clinical effects of ctDCS to compensate poor use of predictive internal models for social perception.

(2024). Excitatory cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation boosts the leverage of prior knowledge for predicting actions [journal article - articolo]. In SOCIAL COGNITIVE AND AFFECTIVE NEUROSCIENCE. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10446/268271

Excitatory cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation boosts the leverage of prior knowledge for predicting actions

Cattaneo, Zaira;
2024-03-02

Abstract

The cerebellum causally supports social processing by generating internal models of social events based on statistical learning of behavioral regularities. However, whether the cerebellum is only involved in forming or also in using internal models for the prediction of forthcoming actions is still unclear. We used cerebellar transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (ctDCS) to modulate the performance of healthy adults in using previously learned expectations in an action prediction task. In a first learning phase of this task, participants were exposed to different levels of associations between specific actions and contextual elements, to induce the formation of either strongly or moderately informative expectations. In a following testing phase, which assessed the use of these expectations for predicting ambiguous (i.e. temporally occluded) actions, we delivered ctDCS. Results showed that anodic, compared to sham, ctDCS boosted the prediction of actions embedded in moderately, but not strongly, informative contexts. Since ctDCS was delivered during the testing phase, that is after expectations were established, our findings suggest that the cerebellum is causally involved in using internal models (and not just in generating them). This encourages the exploration of the clinical effects of ctDCS to compensate poor use of predictive internal models for social perception.
articolo
2-mar-2024
Oldrati, Viola; Butti, Niccolò; Ferrari, Elisabetta; Cattaneo, Zaira; Urgesi, Cosimo; Finisguerra, Alessandra
(2024). Excitatory cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation boosts the leverage of prior knowledge for predicting actions [journal article - articolo]. In SOCIAL COGNITIVE AND AFFECTIVE NEUROSCIENCE. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10446/268271
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10446/268271
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